Horses in the Sand

Frankly told with humour and courage,

Forthcoming in Spring 2022, Horses in the Sand is a collection of stories telling of one queer woman’s journey to becoming a tradeswoman, teacher and artist from meagre beginnings as a child.  It speaks of self-acceptance and how identity over time changes.  It’s also a celebration of pride in building a home, creating art, telling stories and finding both her natural father and an indigenous community she never knew she belonged to.

Horses in the Sand
First_Gear_Cover_3

First Gear - A Motorcycle Memoir

A powerful story of childhood physical, emotional and sexual abuse unrolls as the author,

at age 50 and living with Multiple Sclerosis, rides her 2009 Harley-Davidson — named Thelma D. — from Ottawa to Winnipeg and back, with detours through northern Ontario and Quebec.  During her ride through the stunning landscape of the Canadian Shield, she shares stories of her childhood growing up in the 1970s with her three brothers, a violent father and an alcoholic mother.  Told with a frank openness and humour, First Gear is ultimately the story of courage, survival, and recovery.

Buy First Gear

Please support Inanna, an independent feminist press, or search out your local bookstore like Novel Idea in Kingston, or visit a Chapters – Indigo in your community.  Thank you.

Lorrie

Photo by Paula Robert

About the author

Tradeswoman, artist and teacher, Lorrie Potvin,

a queerishly two-spirited Métis, is the author of Horses in the Sand (Spring 2022) and First Gear – A Motorcycle Memoir (2015).  She lives on the traditional territory of the Anishinaabe and Haudenosaunee.

Lorrie's stories had me laughing and crying. As an Indigenous woman who has had similar feelings and experiences I found her candor and humor refreshing. Stories from our women are certainly needed in a field once dominated by men's stories.

Beverly Little Thunder, Two-Spirit Lakota Elder

Author of the memoir One Bead at a Time (2016)

Short Stories & Essays

The_dock_300x300

The 13th Dock

Writing at Wintergreen, An Anthology edited by Helen Humphreys

Buddy waves over to me and yells “hi,” his pubic hair and penis a black fuzzy circle in the middle of his groin.

My tattoos speak of life and loss

The Globe and Mail

Black pieces of epidermis are curling up and flaking off as my body heals itself from the assault of a tattoo machine.

Why I'm thankful for multiple sclerosis

The Globe and Mail

I wish someone would hurt me. Not kill-me kind of hurt, but enough to damage me visibly.

The Trouble With Wishes

#sicknotweak

Twenty-five years ago during my depressive and chaotic thirties I wanted, wished even, to be sick. I practically begged for any diagnosis during . . .

Scroll to Top